Maps and mappers of the 2018 GeoHipster calendar — Atanas Entchev, October

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: I am an architect and urban planner by training, and GISer by circumstance since 1991. I founded ENTCHEV GIS in 2005 and GeoHipster in 2013. Currently (since 2015) I am the GIS specialist for Franklin Township, NJ. Read more about me in my GeoHipster interview.

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

A: This map is one in a series offering visual representation of all reported animal-vehicle crashes in Franklin Township over the course of several years. The map series informs environmental policy decisions in the town, particularly with regard to hunting regulations. I felt that discrete representation of point events was not communicating well the story behind the data, being that many animal crashes locations were concentrated in tight clusters — hence my choice of heat mapping for the series. I learned that deer population moves over time, which is probably obvious, but I never thought about it before.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

A: The map uses data from police reports. The project started in a MapInfo derivative, moved to QGIS, then ArcMap, then Paint.net. Data was originally created in MapInfo TAB, moved to SHP (hi, @shapefile! 🙂 ), then to GeoTIFF, to PNG, to PDN, to PNG, ultimately to PDF (of course!).

 

Maps and mappers of the 2018 GeoHipster calendar: Nathaniel Jeffrey, September

Q: Tell us about yourself.

I’ve been making maps professionally for over 10 years now.  But when I’m not doing that, I could be cooking, messing around in VR (how exactly do you ingest geojson into Unity, anyway?), or running about as fast as the world’s fastest 90 year old.  Seriously, I looked it up; his name is Frederico Fischer. My sprinting pace is terrible, but it keeps my legs thicc at least.

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

Oh hey, speaking of running – my boss had the idea for this map while he was training for his first marathon.  He came into work on Monday and explained how cool it would be if we could produce a map that showed the bounding boxes of every map our business had ever made.  I agreed that it would indeed be cool. Then I promptly forgot about it.

Working on something completely unrelated a couple of months later, which required me to programmatically extract the coordinates at the corners of some map documents, I was reminded of his idea.  A bit of Python frankenscripting later – with StackExchange acting as Igor – and I was able to unleash this on our entire corporate directory of map files. Turns out, in ten years of using our current GIS, we’ve collectively authored over eighty thousand maps.

Zooming in to Melbourne (which accounted for 30,000+ maps on its own), I started to play around with layered transparencies to visualise the data.  This eventually evolved into a nice glowy blue colour scheme, which reminded me of deep space images of clusters of stars and galaxies, connected by glowing filaments.

This map has no practical use.  I’m fine with that. There’s still something really satisfying about it, how it just hints at the tens of thousands of hours of work that went in to making all of those maps, which are reduced down to their most basic representation.  It looks nice too (I think). If you got a GeoHipster calendar, I hope you think so too, because you’re stuck with it for this month.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

To scrape the data: A simple, custom Python script, run over a big and messy nested directory structure, full of .mxd files.  It extracted the x/y min/max coordinates of every map document, and reconstituted them into a shapefile full of rectangles.

To visualise the data: A mixture of ArcGIS Pro (I love the feature-level transparency), InkScape, and Paint.net.  

 

Maps and mappers of the 2018 GeoHipster calendar: Topi Tjukanov, August

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: I’m a geospatial geek from Finland. I do this kind of visualization for fun and as a freelancing work. You can read more about me from this GeoHipster interview: http://geohipster.com/2018/04/16/topi-tjukanov-in-finnish-basemaps-forest-is-white/

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

A: I originally saw the Roads to Rome project from moovel Lab and was really inspired by that. I wanted to recreate that with my own tools. I had already done a few similar maps before this, but this one was custom made for the GeoHipster calendar submissions! While making the map I learned a lot more about Python. Basically before venturing into this, my Python skills were almost non-existent, but this was a great way to learn as I had a clear goal in mind. Writing the simple script for the API calls was a small step for mankind, but a big step for me. I wanted to keep the style really simple and clean so I didn’t want to add anything else than the routes and graticules on the final map.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

A: The data is from OpenStreetMap. Routing is done with the great GraphHopper open source routing engine. GPX routes were then stored into a single PostGIS table and visualized with QGIS. Graticules are from Natural Earth.

You can find a bit more info, links, and an animated version here: https://tjukanov.org/roadsofamerica/