2017 GeoHipster Calendar is Now Available

The 2017 GeoHipster calendar is available to order (NOTE: “Starting Month” defaults to the current month at the time of order. Remember to change to January 2017). Thanks to all who submitted maps for the calendar. If your map made it into the calendar, we will send you a complimentary copy (please email your shipping address to pbr@geohipster.com).

2017_geohipster_calendar_cover

Many thanks to Jonah Adkins and Ralph Straumann for the thought and effort they put into this year’s design. Also, special thanks to Mapbox for their continued support in helping to make the calendar possible.

Have a great holiday season!

Selections for the 2017 GeoHipster Calendar

Happy GIS Day! We couldn’t think of a better way for GeoHipster to celebrate GIS Day than to announce the selections for the 2017 GeoHipster calendar. Every year has yielded fantastic work and this year was no exception.

This was the first year we had a student track and we got two submissions. To help us work through the remaining submissions, we enlisted the help of three guest reviewers. This was a way to ensure that the process included fresh perspectives in addition to those of the members of the advisory board. So, we’d like to take time to thank Gretchen Peterson, Terence Stigers, and Brian Timoney for lending their professional and creative expertise to the review process.

Thanks also Jonah Adkins and Ralph Straumann, who acted as this year’s design team. I think you’ll be impressed when the calendar comes available. Speaking of that, we expect the calendar to be ready for purchase before Thanksgiving. Keep an eye out for an announcement!

So, without further delay, here are the cartographers whose work was selected for the 2017 GeoHipster calendar:

Michele Tobias – NASA Moon Trees
Mark Brown – Photorealistic Terrain Model from UAV Photogrammetry
Philip Steenkamp (student) – Netherlands Deltawerken
Damian Spangrud – Redefining Tornado Alley
Johann & Juernjakob Dugge – Raised Relief of Mount St. Helens
Ralph Straumann – Boston Summer Farmers’ Markets Walkability
Langdon Sanders – Sandy Springs, Georgia Sidewalk Network
Nathaniel Jeffrey – Melbourne, Australia Suburban Frontier
Alison DeGraff – Historic Hurricane Tracks
Alex Hersfeldt (student) – The Unified Republic of Tangland
Jan-Willem van Aalst – Amsterdam Canals from Open Data
Andrew Nelson – Visualization of Multi-Beam Bathymetric Survey Data

As you can see, the topics were wide-ranging; demonstrating the versatility of maps and imagination of cartographers. As for the maps themselves…you have to wait for your calendar to arrive in the mail!

Congratulations to all whose work was selected. Thanks to everyone who submitted. All will be featured on the GeoHipster web site.

Have a great GIS Day!

Maps and mappers of the 2016 calendar: Katie Kowalsky

In our series “Maps and mappers of the 2016 calendar” we will present throughout 2016 the mapmakers who submitted their creations for inclusion in the 2016 GeoHipster calendar.

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Katie Kowalsky

Q: Tell us about yourself.

A: katie_hi I’m Katie, a cartographer, hot sauce enthusiast, and recent San Francisco transplant. I work at Mapzen where I focus on building tutorials, writing documentation, and supporting our users through improving the usability of our products. This means in a given week I can be running user research testing, answering support questions or talking at a lot of events.

Q: Tell us the story behind your map (what inspired you to make it, what did you learn while making it, or any other aspects of the map or its creation you would like people to know).

A: I come from a family of artists and since I was little, art museums always feel like home to me. Some of my favorite pieces at the Milwaukee Art Museum (my hometown!) are by Roy Lichtenstein, including Crying Girl and Water Lily Pond Reflections. These two pieces have always been examples of his great use of primary colors and Ben-day dots. This color and texture palette has always stayed in the back of my mind. When I started learning about Tilemill and basemap design, I was inspired by how creative and unique the designers from Stamen and Mapbox were. While working at the Cartography Lab at UW-Madison, I had a chance to rebuild curriculum teaching basemap design and was inspired by my love of pop art to bring that into a basemap design to use as an example for the lab tutorial.

Q: Tell us about the tools, data, etc., you used to make the map.

A: This was built entirely in Mapbox Studio (now known as Classic), using Mapbox-Streets and their vector terrain source for the data. I built this interactive basemap (view it here) from zoom 1 to 22 using the glorious CartoCSS interface!

'Roy Lichtenstein-inspired map of DC' by Katie Kowalsky
‘Roy Lichtenstein-inspired map of DC’ by Katie Kowalsky
'Crying Girl' by Roy Lichtenstein
‘Crying Girl’ by Roy Lichtenstein
'Water Lily Pond Reflections' by Roy Lichtenstein
‘Water Lily Pond Reflections’ by Roy Lichtenstein